Interpolation

TimEL will interpolate a value when some operation requires a higher granularity than the one provided by the value.

In this process, TimEL will discriminate between the two numeric data types available:

  • Averages;
  • Integrals.

A variable is an average if the following property follows:

 A = k for ∀a,b,c: a < b < c and ∀t: a ≤ t < c
 →
 A = k for ∀t: a ≤ t < b
 and A = k for ∀t: b ≤ t < c

An average models correctly any derivate function, such as:

  • The speed a vehicle;
  • A price of a stock quote.

As a practical example, you can think that if a stock price was 100$ from 09:00 to 15:00, then one can say that the stock price was 100$ from 09:00 to 12:00 and again 100$ from 12:00 to 15:00.

An integral variable is a variable which express a relationship between a value (energy) and a time (its interval), such as:

  • The electricity consumed (kWh) per period;
  • The number of calls received per period;

For an integral variable, TimEL uses linear interpolation, so:

 A = k for ∀a,b,c: a < b < c and ∀t: a ≤ t < c 
 → 
 A = k * (b - a) / (c - a) for ∀t: a ≤ t < b 
 and A = k * (c - b) / (c - a) for ∀t: b ≤ t < c

As a practical example, you can think that if a device consumed 10kWh from 09:00 to 15:00, then one can say that the same device consumed 5kWh from 09:00 to 12:00 and again 5kWh from 12:00 to 15:00.

Every numeric constant is treated as an average by TimEL, to convert an average into an Integral refer to the Integral function.

  • interpolation.txt
  • Last modified: 2013/11/26 13:52
  • (external edit)